Screen Print

Screen Printing is a printing technique that uses a mesh screen that has areas specially removed in the shape of the artwork. A squeegee pushes ink through the open areas of the screen onto the product below the screen.

The Printing Process: A screen is made of a piece of porous finely woven fabric called mesh and is stretched over a frame of aluminium or wood. Areas of the screen are blocked off with a non-permeable material to form a stencil, which is a negative of the image to be printed. The open spaces are where the ink will appear. Before ink is applied to the screen, the screen and frame must go through a process referred to as pre-press. In this process, an emulsion is scooped across the mesh and the exposure unit burns away the unnecessary emulsion leaving behind a clean area in the mesh with the identical shape as the desired image. The surface that the substrate will be printed against is coated with a wide pallet tape. The last process in the pre-press is blocking out any unwanted ‘pin-holes’ in the emulsion. To block out these holes, materials such as tapes, specialty emulsions and block-out pens may be used effectively. The screen is placed atop a substrate such as paper or fabric. Ink is placed on top of the screen, and a flood bar is used to fill the mesh openings with ink. The ink that is in the mesh opening is pumped or squeezed by capillary action to the substrate in a controlled and prescribed amount, meaning that the wet ink that is deposited is proportional to the thickness of the mesh. With textile items that are printed with multi-colour designs, a wet on wet technique is most often used. With this process colors are dried while the textile item is still on the press.

Email us ([email protected]) or fill out the short form below to get started.

We use Mesh Screens which are made of a finely woven fabric, called mesh, and stretched over a frame. Areas of the screen are blocked off with a non-permeable material to form a stencil, which is a negative of the image to be printed. The open spaces are where the ink will appear. Ink is applied to the screen and a squeegee pushes the ink from top to bottom across the screen pushing ink through the open areas of the screen onto the garment.

Q: Are your inks Phthalate free?

A: Yes, All of our inks are non-Phthalate.

Q: Are there any additional setup or screen charges?

A: No, the screen and setup charges are already built into the pricing structure.

Q: Is an underbase required?

A: No, but it is highly recommended and used by default on all colored garments. The underbase ensures the color accuracy remains when printing on colored garments. It also ensures the imprint will not appear faded.

Q: What is an ink change?

A: An ink change is when the imprints screens can be used for multiple colorways (i.e. all gold print, and all white imprint). The gold would be removed and white put in it’s place on the same screen.

Q: What are halftones?

A: Halftones are a way to simulate shading, gradients, or blends by using a dot pattern.

Q: What are Special Effect Inks?

A: Below are all of our ink types. Special Effect inks are everything besides traditional plastisol, and process inks. These have special pricing and, on some, minimum quantities.

Max Imprint Size: 14.5″W x 18″H

Minimum Quantity: 12 Pieces

The most important step to creating a photo-realistic screen print is the color separation. A real photo will have hundreds of color variants, but as you know, there is a maximum number of screens a machine can handle. Simulated Process is an advanced color separation technique that uses halftones of a few ink colors to represent the colors in the original design.

The above information & capabilities are based on our in house production & 3rd party production services.